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May 8, 2014

“Interracial Romance on Film” course open for registration

Microsoft Word - ES370, Summer 2014 flyer.doc

March 24, 2014

Will Work for Justice: ES Alumni in Social Justice Careers

alumn panel

UO Ethnic Studies alumni are playing leadership roles in social justice organizations, government, and education, putting the principles of ethnic studies into practice. On November 15, 2013, seven distinguished  ES alumni returned to campus to participate in a panel titled “Will Work for Justice: ES Alumni in Social Justice Careers.” The panel drew current students and alumni as well as participants from other Oregon campuses who were in Eugene to attend the annual Oregon Students of Color Conference at the UO that weekend.

Panelists discussed the many ways that ethnic studies prepared them to work as organizers, educators, trainers, researchers and advocates, and shared advice with current students about pursing opportunities to join this vibrant field. The panelists included:

ITON UDOSENATA, Principal, Cottage Grove (OR) High School, (ES ’03)–A graduate of North Eugene High School, Iton worked as a teacher and administrator at Willamette High School and in the Springfield School District before being named principal of Cottage Grove High School in 2013.

DIEGO HERNANDEZ, Board of Directors, Reynolds School District, (ES ’10)–Recently elected to a four-year term to the Board of Directors of the Reynolds School District in Portland (his high school alma mater), Diego was also recently named co-director of the Momentum Alliance in Portland.

CARINA MILLER, Former Service Coordinator at Children’s Protective Services for Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, (ES ’11)–Carina handled Assisted Guardianship and child abuse and neglect cases and ran the Independent Living Program for the federally recognized Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs (OR).

JEN LLERAS, Trainer and Organizer, Western States Center (ES ’08)–Jen collaborates with dozens of community-based organizations across the Northwest to build a progressive movement for social, economic, racial and environmental justice.

KYLE WEISMANN-YEE, Project Assistant, McKenzie River Gathering Foundation, (ES ’08)–Kyle works with Oregon’s leading progressive foundation on fundraising, grantmaking, communications, and office management, helping to direct a half-million dollars in grants to community based organizations every year.

KHANH LE, Strategic Alliances Coordinator, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), Portland. (ES ’06)–Khanh works with one of the nation’s leading public employee unions to build long-term partnerships between union members and community-based organizations.

NATE GULLEY, Civic Engagement Coordinator, Oregon Voice, (ES ’08)–Nate builds the political engagement capacities of community and advocacy organizations across the state, with a particular emphasis on bridging the gap between organizing and technology.

October 10, 2013

Dr. Martin Summers speaks at 3rd Annual Pascoe Lecture

Summers Poster FINAL

On November 15, past ES Director, Professor Martin Summers returned to the University of Oregon to deliver the 3rd Annual Peggy Pascoe Memorial Lecture.  In honor of his own mentor, and mentor to many others across the country, Summers’ eloquently remembered the important work of our beloved colleague, Peggy Pascoe. His talk,”‘Broken Fragments of the Primitive Life’: Race and Dynamic Psychiatry in the Early-Twentieth-Century,” was drawn from his archival research of St. Elizabeth Hospital, a federal mental institution in Washington, DC.  Discussing specifically the way the hospital treated African American patients, Summers explores the intersections of the historical process of racial formation, medical and cultural understandings of mental illness, and the exercise of institutional power.

Special thanks to the History Department, and the Beekman Professor of Northwest and Pacific History, Dr. Jeff Ostler, for co-sponsoring and supporting this annual event that means so much to both of our departments. 

October 9, 2013

Reception Honoring ES Alumni – Friday, Nov. 15, 4-5:30 PM

Please join us in the Browsing Room of the Knight Library for an open reception honoring ES alumni, with special guest Dr. Martin Summers, ES Program Director from 2004-2006. We invite all ES alumni, students, faculty and friends to reconnect with ES graduates as well as Dr. Summers, who led a critical expansion of ES during his time as Director and championed diversity and equity efforts across campus.

For questions or to RSVP for the event, please email Michael King: mjk@uoregon.edu

ES Alumni Panel: Careers in Social Justice

Friday, November 15, 3-4:00 PM, Knight Browsing Room

UO Ethnic Studies alumni are playing leadership roles in many prominent social justice organizations in the region. Join us as we learn more about their work as organizers, educators, trainers, researchers and policy advocates and find out the ways that ES prepared them for these critical positions.

Participants in the Panel will include:

Nate Gulley, Civic Engagement Coordinator, Our Oregon (ES ’08)
Diego Hernandez, Reynold School Board Member, (ES ’10)
Jen Lleras, Trainer and Organizer, Western States Center (ES ’08)
Kyle Weismann-Yee, Project Assistant, McKenzie River Gathering Foundation, (ES ’08)
Iton Udosenata, Principal, Cottage Grove High School, (ES ’03)
Khanh Le, Strategic Alliances Coordinator, American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, (ES ’06)
September 16, 2013

Hames-García: Faculty Excellence Award & CSWS Director

Recognized for his illustrious research record, campus leadership, and standing in his field nationwide, Michael Hames-García was selected to receive the Fund for Faculty Excellence. His major publications include, Fugitive Thought: Prison Movements, Race, and the Meaning of Justice (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2004), Identity Complex: Making the Case for Multiplicity, (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2011), the Lambda Award winning Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader, co-edited with Ernesto Martínez (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011), Reclaiming Identity: Realist Theory and the Predicament of Postmodernism, co-edited with Paula M. L. Moya (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000), and Identity Politics Reconsidered, co-edited with Linda Martín Alcoff, Satya Mohanty, and Paula M. L. Moya (Palgrave, 2006). At the University of Oregon, Hames-García served as the Program Director and Department Head of Ethnic Studies from 2008-2011, and from 2005-2011 the director of the Center for Race Ethnicity and Sexuality Studies.

According to Provost Jim Bean, “The recipients of this honor have been chosen on the basis of scholarly impact within their respective fields, their contributions to program and institutional quality at the UO, and their academic leadership.”  Congratulations Professor Hames-García – this is recognition well deserved!

Starting Fall 2014 Hames-García will begin his reign as the director of the University of Oregon’s Center for the Study of Women and Society (CSWS). For 40 years CSWS has been funding feminist scholarship and been a hub for feminist research through an endowment and mission to “create, fund, and share research that addresses the complicated nature of gender identities and inequalities.” Hames-Garcia is perfect to take the helm after the center’s 40th anniversary, and further the important projects established under the leadership of Carol Stabile.

March 6, 2013

Martinez Nominated for Lambda Literary Award

Professor Ernesto Martinez’s book, On Making Sense: Queer Race Narratives of Intelligibility, is a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in the LGBT Studies category.  His book is truly cutting edge work in queer race studies – he courageously challenges dominant epistemological paradigms in the field through a careful, thought provoking, and provocative lens.

Last year, Martinez received the Lambda Literary Award with his co-editor Michael Hames Garcia for their book, Gay Latino Studies: A Reader.

December 18, 2012

Pascoe Lecture Series hosts Estelle Freedman on Jan 25, 2013

Save the date for the Ethnic Studies Second Annual Peggy Pascoe Memorial Lecture featuring Dr. Estelle Freedman, Friday January 25, 2013, refreshments start at noon and her lecture will begin at 12:30pm in the Knight Browsing Room. She will be speaking about her new forthcoming book, Redefining Rape, that brings together racial justice and women’s rights responses to sexual violence in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Dr. Freedman will also doing a graduate student workshop later that evening in the Alder Building Conference Room. The workshop is open to graduate students whose work engages Ethnic Studies scholarship.

For further information, please visit the lecture page of our website at http://ethnic.uoregon.edu/pascoe-lecture-series-2.

September 20, 2012

Cheney Wins Women’s Historian Award for “Blacks on Brown”

Prof. Charise Cheney recently won the Western Association of Women’s Historians’ Judith Lee Ridge Prize for her article “Blacks on Brown: Intra-Comunity Debates over School Desegregation in Topeka, KS, 1941-1955,” which was published this winter in the Western Historical Quarterly. This same article also garnered Honorable Mention for the 2012 Oral History Article Award for outstanding use of oral history.

September 10, 2012

Two Professors Win Lambda Literary Award in New York.

Ernesto Javier Martínez and Michael Hames-García—both professors in the Department of Ethnic Studies—were awarded the prestigious national Lambda Literary Award in the category of “best LGBT anthology” for their co-edited book Gay Latino Studies: A Critical Reader (Duke University Press, 2011).

This award was announced in early June at a sold-out gala ceremony in New York City. The event attracted over 400 attendees, sponsors, and celebrities to celebrate excellence in LGBT literature.

Previous winners of the Lambda Award include fiction writers Michael Cunningham, Jeanette Winterson, Colm Toibin, and Armistead Maupin; noted historians Martin Duberman, Alan Berube, and Lillian Faderman; mystery writers Joseph Hansen, Nicola Griffith, and Michael Nava; poets Adrienne Rich and Mark Doty; and playwright Tony Kushner.

Praise for the book:

Judith Halberstam, Professor of English at the University of Southern California, writes that Gay Latino Studies “ is a startlingly original collection of essays on the culture and social worlds of gay Latinos. Using a wonderful format that pairs essays with response pieces, the book as a whole reads like a sparkling conversation full of wit, insight, cultural relevance, and political critique. Covering topics from gay shame and shamelessness, to dance and sexual identity, to the impact of HIV on gay Latino communities, Gay Latino Studies will quickly find its way onto bookshelves and into classrooms around the world.”

Ramón Saldívar, Professor of English at Stanford University, writes “This collection will be an indispensable reference for any scholar working in queer or Latina/o studies. With its broad disciplinary and theoretical scope, it effectively establishes the field of gay Latino studies. It will shape the questions posed in this realm of study for some time to come

For more information, please contact Ernesto Javier Martinez (ejm@uoregon.edu).

HoSang’s RACIAL PROPSITIONS Wins Rawley Prize

Book Cover: Racial Propositons: Ballot Initiatives and the Making of Postwar CaliforniaProfessor Daniel Martinez HoSang received the 2011 James A. Rawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians for his book Racial Propositions: Ballot Initiatives and the Making of Postward California. The OAH declared Racial Propositions the best book on the history of race relations in the US.

The work also received the following honors:

-  John Hope Franklin Prize – Honorable Mention, American Studies Association

- Oliver Cromwell Cox Award – Honorable Mention, Racial and Ethnic Minorities Section of the American Sociological Association

Racial Formation in the Twenty-First Century

Book Cover: Racial Formation in the Twenty-First CenturyEdited by Daniel Martinez HoSang, Oneka LaBennett, and Laura Pulido. 

Available now from the University of California Press (For a 20% discount enter source code 12M0402 in the discount box) and Amazon. See Facebook page.

DESCRIPTION

Michael Omi and Howard Winant’s Racial Formation in the United States remains one of the most influential books and widely read books about race. Racial Formation in the 21st Century, arriving twenty-five years after the publication of Omi and Winant’s influential work, brings together fourteen essays by leading scholars in law, history, sociology, ethnic studies, literature, anthropology and gender studies to consider the past, present and future of racial formation.

The contributors explore far-reaching concerns: slavery and land ownership; labor and social movements; torture and war; sexuality and gender formation; indigineity and colonialism; genetics and the body. From the ecclesiastical courts of seventeenth century Lima to the cell blocks of Abu Grahib, the essays draw from Omi and Winant’s influential theory of racial formation and adapt it to the various criticisms, challenges, and changes of life in the twenty-first century.

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“This collection of essays marking the twenty-fifth anniversary of the publication of Michael Omi and Howard Winant’s Racial Formation in the United States demonstrates the importance and influence of the concept of racial formation. The range of disciplines, discourses, ideas, and ideologies makes for fascinating reading, demonstrating the utility and applicability of racial formation theory to diverse contexts, while at the same time presenting persuasively original extensions and elaborations of it. This is an important book, one that sums up, analyzes, and builds on some of the most important work in racial studies during the past three decades.”—George Lipsitz, author of How Racism Takes Place

“Racial Formation in the Twenty-First Century is truly a state-of-the-field anthology, fully worthy of the classic volume it honors—timely, committed, sophisticated, accessible, engaging. The collection will be a boon to anyone wishing to understand the workings of race in the contemporary United States.” —Matthew Frye Jacobson, Professor of American Studies, Yale University

“This stimulating and lively collection demonstrates the wide-ranging influence and generative power of Omi and Winant’s racial formation framework. The contributors are leading scholars in fields ranging from the humanities and social sciences to legal and policy studies. They extend the framework into new terrain, including non-U.S. settings, gender and sexual relations, and the contemporary warfare state. While acknowledging the pathbreaking nature of Omi and Winant’s intervention, the contributors do not hesitate to critique what they see as limitations and omissions. This is a must-read for anyone striving to make sense of tensions and contradictions in racial politics in the U.S. and transnationally.”—Evelyn Nakano Glenn, editor of Shades of Difference: Why Skin Color Matters

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction
Daniel Martinez HoSang and Oneka LaBennett
Part I. Racial Formation Theory Revisited
 
1. Gendering Racial Formation
Priya Kandaswamy
2. On the Specificities of Racial Formation: Gender and Sexuality in the Historiographies of Race
Roderick A. Ferguson3. The Transitivity of Race and the Challenge of the Imagination
James Kyung-Jin Lee

4. Indigeneity, Settler Colonialism, White Supremacy
Andrea Smith

Part II. Racial Projects and Histories of Racialization 


5. The Importance of Being Asian: Growers, the United Farm Workers, and the Rise of Colorblindness
Matthew Garcia
6. The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Black): Legal and Cultural Constructions of Race and Nation in Colonial Latin America
Michelle A. McKinley7. Race, Racialization, and Latino Populations in the United States
Tomás Almaguer

8. Kill the Messengers: Can We Achieve Racial Justice without Mentioning Race?
Gary Delgado

9. The New Racial Preferences: Rethinking Racial Projects
Devon W. Carbado and Cheryl I. Harris

Part III. War and the Racial State


10. “We didn’t kill ’em, we didn’t cut their head off”: Abu Ghraib Revisited
Sherene H. Razack
11. The “War on Terror” as Racial Crisis: Homeland Security, Obama, and Racial (Trans)Formations
Nicholas De Genova12. Racial Formation in an Age of Permanent War
Nikhil Singh

Conclusion. Racial Formation Rules: Continuity, Instability, and Change
Michael Omi and Howard Winant

EDITOR BIOS

Daniel Martinez HoSang is Associate Professor of Political Science and Ethnic Studies at the University of Oregon. His first book, Racial Propositions: Ballot Initiatives and the Making of Postwar California (UC Press), won the James A. Rawley Prize of the Organization of American Historians.

Oneka LaBennett is Associate Professor of African and African American Studies and Director of the American Studies Program at Fordham University. She is the author of She’s Mad Real: Popular Culture and West Indian Girls in Brooklyn.

Laura Pulido is Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at the University of Southern California. Among her books is Black, Brown, Yellow, and Left: Radical Activism in Los Angeles and A People’s Guide to Los Angeles, (UC Press).

August 16, 2012

Fujiwara wins for MOTHERS WITHOUT CITIZENSHIP

Lynn Fujiwara holds her AAAS award iat the 2008 recognition ceremony.

Current Department Head Lynn Fujiwara received the 2010 Book Award in the Social Sciences for her 2008 publication Mothers Without Citizenship: Asian Immigrant Families and Welfare Reform (Minnesota Press). The award was given to Fujiwara by the Association for Asian American Studies.

February 25, 2010

What can the future govenor do for communitites of color?

Professor Hames-Garcia participated in an on-line round table discussion with gubernatorial candidate Bill Bradbury and ES major Lidiana Soto. The topic was “What can the future govenor do for communitites of color?” If you are interested in watching the discussion or sharing it with a friend, visit this site to see the recording please follow this link: Bradbury Roundtable

February 19, 2010

Aftermath of the Aaron Campbell Shooting

Prof. Daniel HoSang was interviewed in an Oregonian article about race and policing in the aftermath of the Aaron Campbell shooting. Read the article here

January 10, 2010

Rigoberto Hinojosa Profile

Ethnic Studies alum Rigoberto Hinojosa wass featured on the University of Oregon spanish-language homepage! See Rigoberto Hinojosa’s Profile