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January 11, 2018

Professor Sharon Luk’s book release “The Life of Paper”

The Life of Paper, Letter and a Poetics of Living Beyond Captivity

January 26, 2018
Noon-2:00pm
Alder 111 in Alder Building (15th and Alder St.)
Questions or details on how to access the building : (541) 346-0900
Click HERE for interactive map

Please RSVP here before Thursday, January 18, 2018

The Department of Ethnic Studies is hosting a luncheon and book symposium highlighting the latest book release of Ethnic Studies professor, Dr. Sharon Luk.

The Life of  Paper, Letters and a Poetics of Living Beyond Captivity will be discussed in the symposium by Yale University’s Dr. Dan HoSang, UC Berkely’s Dr. Colleen Lye, and University of Oregon and Ethnic Studies Professor Michael Hames-Garcia.

Dr. Luk’s book, The Life of Paper, Letters and a Poetics of Living Beyond Captivity offers a wholly original and inspiring analysis of how people facing systematic social dismantling have engaged letter correspondence to remake themselves—from bodily integrity to subjectivity and collective and spiritual being. Exploring the evolution of racism and confinement in California history, this ambitious investigation disrupts common understandings of the early detention of Chinese migrants (1880s–1920s), the internment of Japanese Americans (1930s–1940s), and the mass incarceration of African Americans (1960s–present) in its meditation on modern development and imprisonment as a way of life. Situating letters within global capitalist movements, racial logics, and overlapping modes of social control, Sharon Luk demonstrates how correspondence becomes a poetic act of reinvention and a way to live for those who are incarcerated.

The Department of Ethnic Studies presents:

“Asian Socialism, Magic Realism” presented by Dr. Colleen Lye

January 25th, 2018

3:30-5:00pm

Knight Browsing Room

Light refreshments provided.  Questions: (541) 346-0900

 

Abstract: As interest in global Maoism has gathered steam in recent years, it is perhaps something of a paradox that the Black Panther Party rather than the Asian American Movement has come to represent the most visible manifestation of global Maoism’s US reach. In some ways this is because the Asian American Movement was composed of elements at once too close and too far from the political caprices of the Chinese Communist Party itself during the contradictory period of the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). If global Maoism’s consequences for an Asian American left politics remain in hindsight still indeterminate, its consequences for Asian American literature, however, were extraordinary. Indeed, a closer examination of the emergent form of Asian American literature in the 1970s conceptualized as a response to global Maoism may even open up fresh views of the wider affordances of an Asian American left politics.

 

Bio: Colleen Lye, Associate Professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley, is a leading scholar in the history and politics of literature; race and U.S. empire in the Asia-Pacific; and critical theory. Alongside numerous articles and her award-winning book, America’s Asia: Racial Form and American Literature, 1893-1945 (Princeton UP, 2005), she is the coeditor of several special journal issues: Forms of Asia (Representations, 2007), Financialization and the Culture Industry (Representations 2014), Peripheral Realisms (MLQ 2012), The Humanities and the Crisis of the Public University (Representations 2011), and The Struggle for Public Education in California (SAQ 2011), which won the MLA’s Council of Editors of Learned Journals Award for Best Special Issue of 2011.

 

 

 

 

November 3, 2017

Renowned lawyer and playwright Mary Kathryn Nagle presents “Sovereignty in the Law, Sovereignty in Our Stories

The Department of Ethnic Studies welcomes renowned lawyer and playwright

Mary Kathryn Nagle

“Sovereignty in the Law, Sovereignty in Our Stories”

 Friday, November 17, 2017

 Noon-1:30pm

 Knight Browsing Room

 

Mary Kathryn Nagle is a renowned lawyer and playwright in Indian Country. She is a partner at Pipestem Law, a law firm specializing in sovereignty of Native tribes and peoples. In 2013 she authored an amicus brief for the famous “Baby Veronica” case before the US Supreme Court and assisted with the amending of the Violence Against Women Act to include tribal jurisdiction over non-Indian perpetrators of domestic violence. She has written numerous plays, including ManahattaFairly TraceableSliver of a Full Moon, and many others. She is the executive director of Yale University’s Indigenous Performing Arts Program. She is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma.

 

The Native Play Reading Group will perform a concert reading of Nagle’s play Sliver of a Full Moon on November 17, 7:00-9:00pm at the Many Nations Longhouse.—

October 19, 2017

The Department of Ethnic Studies welcomes Distinguished Professor Lisa Lowe November 2, 2017

The Department of Ethnic Studies presents Dr. Lisa Lowe “Archives, Materiality, History” for the 6th Annual Peggy Pascoe Memorial Lecture on November 2, 2017 from 3:00-4:30pm in the Gumwood Room (EMU 245)

Drawing connections between the past and the present, this presentation will discuss interdisciplinary methods for constituting and interpreting archival documents and material culture in the recovery of transhemispheric links between European liberalism, settler colonialism in the Americas, the transatlantic African slave trade, and trades in Asia during the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Lisa Lowe is Professor of English and Studies in Race, Colonialism, and Diaspora at Tufts University, where she also directs the Center for the Humanities. Before teaching at Tufts, she taught at UC San Diego. She began as a scholar of comparative literature, and her research and teaching has focused especially on race, colonialism, immigration, empire, and globalization. She is the author of Immigrant Acts: On Asian American Cultural Politics (Duke UP, 1996), and co-editor of The Politics of Culture in the Shadow of Capital (Duke UP, 1997). Her most recent book, The Intimacies of Four Continents (Duke UP, 2015), is a study of settler colonialism, transatlantic African slavery, and the East Indies and China trades in goods and people as the conditions for modern European liberalism and empire.
September 18, 2017

Walidah Imarisha – “Why Aren’t There More Black People in Oregon?: A Hidden History”

FOR LIVE STREAM CLICK HERE

 

 


Thursday, October 12, 2017 3:30-5:00pm

Lillis 182 Lecture Hall

955 E. 13th Ave.

(13th and Kincaid Streets)

Eugene, OR 97403

UO Campus

Walidah Imarisha describes herself as an historian at heart, reporter by (w)right, and rebel by reason. Winner of a 2017 Oregon Book Award for creative nonfiction for Angels with Dirty Faces: Three Stories of Crime, Prison, and Redemption, she also has edited two anthologies, authored a poetry collection, and is currently working on an Oregon Black history book, forthcoming from AK Press.

Imarisha has taught in Stanford University’s Program of Writing and Rhetoric, Portland State University’s Black Studies Department, Oregon State University’s Women Gender Sexuality Studies Department, and Southern New Hampshire University’s English Department. She spent six years with Oregon Humanities’ Conversation Project as a public scholar facilitating programs across Oregon about Oregon Black history, alternatives to incarceration, and the history of hip hop.
http://www.walidah.com/

May 30, 2017

The Big Picture: Structural Racism, Equity & Intersectionality, featuring Rinku Sen

Tuesday, June 6, 2017
4:00 – 5:30 p.m.
Knight Library Browsing Room
1501 Kincaid St.
University of Oregon
Free & open to the public

Part of the Imagining Freedom Teach-In Series. Sponsored by the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Center for the Study of Women in Society, and the EMU Center for Student Involvement.

Photo of Rinku SenRinku Sen is the president and executive director of Race Forward: The Center for Racial Justice Innovation and the publisher of the award-winning news site Colorlines. Race Forward brings systemic analysis and an innovative approach to complex race issues to help people take effective action toward racial equity through research, media, and practice. A visionary and a pragmatist, Sen is one of the leading voices in the racial justice movement, building upon the legacy of civil rights by transforming the way we talk about race, from something that is individual, intentional, and overt to something that is systemic, unconscious, and hidden.
Sen’s cutting edge book Stir it Up, read widely by community organizers and taught on campuses across the country, theorized a model of community organizing that integrates a political analysis of race, gender, class, poverty, sexuality, and other issues.
Sen’s second book, The Accidental American: Immigration and Citizenship in the Age of Globalization, told the story of Moroccan immigrant Fekkak Mamdouh, who co-founded the Restaurant Opportunities Center of New York in the aftermath of September 11. It is currently being made into a film.

April 17, 2017

Ethnic Studies Now: A Student Research Symposium

Friday, May 12
Centro Cultural Cesar Chavez
Oregon State University
Free and open to the public

Join us for a multi-institutional discussion of student research and creative work in Ethnic Studies. Students and faculty from universities and colleges in Oregon and Washington are invited to participate. Hosted by Oregon State University and University of Oregon.

Submit research by Friday, April 21, 2017.

 

February 7, 2017

Books-in-Print talk: Corazón de Dixie: Mexicanos in the U.S. South since 1910

Featuring Julie Weise, UO History Department.
February 24, 2017
Noon
Humanities Center Conference Room (159 PLC).
Sponsor: OHC. Information: (541) 346-3934.
January 29, 2017

Undocumented Students in the Age of Trump: What Every Campus Needs to Know

An Imagining Freedom Teach-In featuring María Blanco, executive director of the Undocumented Student Legal Services Center, UC Davis. Tuesday, January 31, 9-10:00 AM.

Tuesday, January 31, 2017
9:00-10:00 a.m. Light breakfast served.
EMU 107 Redwood Room

The new administration promises dramatic changes to the legal and political status and conditions facing undocumented students. What do faculty, staff and students need to know to navigate this new environment? What steps can campuses take to proactively protect their students? What role might Dreamers play in challenging this new regime?

This session features María Blanco, Executive Director of the Undocumented Student Legal Services Center, which operates out of UC Davis School of Law to provide immigration-related legal services for undocumented students at the six University of California campuses without law schools. Launched in November 2014, the Center is a pilot project of the University of California Office of the President and works in collaboration with the UC Davis School of Law Immigration Law Clinic.
RSVP to Daniel HoSang, dhosang@uoregon.edu Sponsored by the Department of Ethnic Studies.
November 1, 2016

Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Featuring Ibram X. Kendi, University of Florida.

Wednesday, Nov.30, 2016, 3:30 p.m.
Knight Library Browsing Room

cprwdnpe-1Ibram X. Kendi is the winner of the 2016 National Book award for nonfiction and an assistant professor of contemporary African American history at the University of Florida. In addition to Stamped from the Beginning, he is the author of The Black Campus Movement: Black Students and the Racial Reconstitution of Higher Education, 1965-1972.

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